DRC & Research News

This page shares the latest news in T1D research and DRC’s community.

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New Oral Treatment May Help with Managing HbA1c for Type 1 Diabetes

Keeping HbA1c levels within a healthy range can be challenging for those living with type 1 diabetes. It requires constant vigilance when it comes to monitoring blood sugar levels and administering the appropriate amount of insulin. Even with careful management, there can be complications.

A recent study found that a once-daily pill used in conjunction with insulin may help reduce HbA1c levels by as much as 0.32% after 12 weeks.  The pill, known as TTP399, activates glucokinase in the liver.  This, in turn, stimulates the body to improve glucose utilization which can lead to lower blood glucose levels. Overall, this could help improve HbA1c levels as well as time spent within a healthy glucose range.

A randomized, double-blind, adaptive study compared participants taking the TTP399 pill versus those on a placebo.  Those who received the pill showed improved glucose response and fewer symptomatic hypoglycemic episodes.  The average improvement in HbA1c was 0.21%, and there was also an average of an 11% reduction in the dosage amount of total daily mealtime bolus insulin needed.

On the other hand, the placebo group showed a 0.11% increase in HbA1c after the 12-week trial period.  Neither group reported any incidences of diabetic ketoacidosis, and there was only one incident of severe hypoglycemia, which occurred in the placebo group.

This phase 2 study involved 85 participants. They were all currently either administering daily injections or using an insulin pump.  If they were using a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), they had to be on it for at least three months prior to the start of the study to be included.

According to Steve Holcomb, president and CEO of vTv Therapeutics, “Consistent with FDA guidance, a 0.3% improvement in HbA1c is considered clinically meaningful and coupled with the well-controlled population of patients and favorable safety data from our clinical trials to date, this provides a strong basis for moving this potential first-in-class program forward.”

The pill could be used in conjunction with insulin therapy as a way of further managing and reducing HbA1c levels. This an exciting step forward in terms of type 1 diabetes management and supporting individuals in staying within healthy ranges for HbA1c and daily blood sugar levels.

Diabetes Research Connection (DRC), though not involved with this study, is interested to see how it evolves moving forward, and what it could mean for the future of oral treatment involving noninsulin products.

Research for type 1 diabetes continues to improve and advance every single day, and DRC helps makes this possible by providing critical funding to early-career scientists pursuing novel research studies on type 1 diabetes.  Through generous donations from individuals, corporations, and foundations, they are able to provide researchers with up to $50K in funding to support studies aimed at improving prevention measures, enhancing quality of life, reducing complications, and finding a cure. Learn more by visiting https://diabetesresearchconnection.org.

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Exploring the Impact of Type 1 Diabetes on Bone Health

The body continually goes through a cycle of bone formation and bone resorption. As bone tissue is broken down and calcium is released, new microstructures are formed to support bone growth. Issues with bone metabolism, such as low bone mineral density (BMD), can lead to osteoporosis and other conditions. Studies have shown that adults with type 1 diabetes often have lower BMD.

A recent study found that individuals with type 1 diabetes may be at risk for decreased BMD compared to individuals without the disease. In a study of 173 children and adolescents with T1D compared to 1,410 non-diabetic peers, there was a significant difference in bone turnover markers in participants with T1D. Researchers looked at three different markers based on BMD measurements and blood samples and found that individuals with T1D had fewer of all three types of markers. However, there was no significant difference between bone turnover markers and diabetes duration, or in BMD levels between the two groups.

According to Dr. Jens Otto Broby Madsen, a physician in the department of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at Herlev Hospital in Denmark, “Decreased bone turnover markers might be the first warning of a negative effect of type 1 diabetes on bone health. Bone turnover markers might be a way of screening for early changes, long before changes can be seen by DXA scans.”

This may help improve health, quality of life, and disease management in the future to decrease risk of other conditions in conjunction with T1D, or at least improve early detection. Diabetes Research Connection (DRC) strives to support novel research studies by providing critical funding to early career scientists to help them move forward with their work. It is these types of efforts that increase understanding about the disease and can improve diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and management of T1D. To learn more about current projects and how to help, visit https://diabetesresearchconnection.org.

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