Exploring the Impact of Type 1 Diabetes on Standardized Testing

Posted in Diabetes Research News

Though type 1 diabetes (T1D) can be diagnosed at any age, it is typically diagnosed in childhood. That means that thousands of children grow up and go through school while managing this disease. A recent study looked at the potential effects of T1D on standardized test scores of Danish children.

Researchers evaluated data on standardized reading and math tests from 631,620 Danish public school children in grades 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8. Of the more than 630,000 participants, 2,031 had T1D. After analyzing more than one million reading test scores and nearly 525,000 math test scores, they found that there was no significant difference in results between those children with diabetes versus those without. Adjustments were made for grade, test topics, and year, and comparisons were made both with and without adjusting for socioeconomic status. In both cases, there were no statistically significant differences in results.

It is encouraging to see that the presence of T1D has not had a major impact on standardized testing performance, at least for the Danish schoolchildren who participated in the study. T1D affects many aspects of a person’s life, and it can be difficult to effectively manage, especially for children.

The Diabetes Research Connection (DRC) stays abreast of diverse studies that look not only at how T1D develops and is treated but also its impact on quality of life. DRC provides funding that enables early-career scientists to pursue novel research studies on all facets of the disease in an effort to advance understanding and improve outcomes.