Could Higher-Dose and Lower-Dose Insulin Glargine be Equally Effective in Managing Type 1 Diabetes?

In an effort to maintain greater blood-glucose stability throughout the day and minimize highs and lows, some individuals with type 1 diabetes use insulin glargine, which is a once-a-day, long-acting insulin. It is an analogue, or laboratory-created, insulin which has been modified to act more uniformly in managing glucose levels.

Insulin glargine comes in varying strengths, and a recent study found that there were no significant differences in safety or effectiveness between insulin glargine 100 U/mL and insulin glargine 300 U/mL when administered in children and adolescents. Data from 463 EDITION JUNIOR study participants between the ages of 6 and 17 were compared over 26 weeks. Of those participants, 233 were randomly assigned to insulin glargine 300 U/mL, and 228 were randomly assigned to insulin glargine 100 U/mL. Both groups continued to follow their normal routine for mealtime insulin but injected insulin glargine once per day.

Results showed that all participants experienced a reduction in HbA1c levels over the 26 weeks. However, there were fewer instances of severe hypoglycemia among participants using the insulin glargine 300 U/mL, though overall, results were comparable between groups. Both insulins were effective in achieving target study endpoints and did not demonstrate any unexpected safety concerns.

In comparing insulin glargine 100 U/mL and insulin glargine 300 U/mL, researchers may be able to use insulin glargine 300 U/mL as yet another treatment option for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. It is currently under review by the FDA, and researchers are evaluating data from a six-month safety follow-up.

It is encouraging to see that more options are being explored to meet the needs of individuals living with type 1 diabetes in order to maintain target glucose levels with fewer fluctuations. Diabetes Research Connection (DRC) will continue to follow these types of studies to see how they impact the future of diabetes management and accessibility to care.

DRC provides critical funding for early career scientists pursuing novel, peer-reviewed research studies for type 1 diabetes. Projects aim to improve prevention and treatment of the disease, as well as enhance quality of life and eventually find a cure. To learn more about current studies and support these efforts, visit http://diabetesresearchconnection.org.

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