Advancing Diabetes Management Technology

Posted in Diabetes Research News

Over the years, treatment options for type 1 diabetes have greatly expanded. From the development of continuous glucose monitors to insulin pumps to artificial pancreas systems, researchers are striving to improve the lives of those living with this disease. However, there have also been challenges regarding the accuracy, usability, and lifespan of these options.

One issue that exists is effectively coordinating treatment options to work together. Depending on the device an individual uses, it may not be compatible with a product from a different company, or even from the same company. There may be multiple steps involved in reading and responding to results in order to effectively manage type 1 diabetes.

JDRF is looking toward easing these challenges by partnering with SFC Fluidics, Inc., a medical technology company, to create an interoperable insulin pump. This device would provide continuous insulin therapy through a tubeless system, but unlike other technology, it would be an open protocol system. That means that it would be able to communicate and share information seamlessly with other devices such as CGMs or third-party technology. This would be a huge step forward in potentially improving diabetes care and management. JDRF and SFC Fluidics are currently developing and testing this technology as well as reviewing liability and regulatory requirements.

The Diabetes Research Connection (DRC) is excited to see how this project unfolds and what it could mean for the future of diabetes management. It is through the tireless work of researchers, scientists, and medical professionals that treatment options have continued to improve and more is understood about this complex disease. The DRC provides funding to early career scientists pursuing novel research studies related to type 1 diabetes in an effort to prevent and cure the disease as well as improve quality of life for those living with T1D. To learn more and support current research projects, visit http://diabetesresearchconnection.org.